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How to Quit Smoking Weed – Effective Guides for Quitting Marijuana (Updated for 2020)

By May 27, 2020 June 27th, 2020 No Comments
how to quit smoking weed

You may think you can quit smoking weed whenever you like.

Especially since consuming cannabis or smoking marijuana seems less addictive compared to other drugs.

It might be the case for some, but occasionally, many weed smokers realize it is not easy to quit gradually or cold turkey.

Can You Stop Smoking Weed?

The short answer is yes. 

The long answer is it depends on your dedication and willingness.

Even the heaviest marijuana users can give up weed given the structured support and help.

This guide MAY HELP.

We prepared a comprehensive guide so you can learn how to cut out cannabis.

The best part?

This guide will help you understand why you have developed marijuana addiction.

So you will learn how to cope with quitting weed and recover successfully. 

If you are ready, let’s start.

The Effects of Smoking Cannabis

In the first months of your marijuana consumption, smoking might have helped you calm down or uplift your mood.

Considering the positive side effects in the beginning, cannabis dependence may be inevitable when used frequently.

You may experience short term effects of joy or calmness. But you may also experience the following during or after smoking:

  • Altered sense of time
  • Dry eyes and mouth
  • Changes in mood
  • Anxiety / panic / paranoia
  • Lowered reaction time and impaired body movement/condition
  • Hallucinations (in high doses)

However, the long term effects are the ones that make you consider quitting:

  • Relationship problems
  • Depression and anxiety disorders
  • Lower life satisfaction
  • Less academic and career success
  • Bronchitis/breathing problems
  • Increased risk of schizophrenia, especially heavy use during teenage years.
  • Increase in other substance use disorders like alcohol or cocaine.

You should ASK YOURSELF:

Can you make a positive change by noticing how this substance harms your life?

If your answer is yes, let’s continue. 

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First, Learn About The Conditioning and Triggers

When you want to quit, you will realize it is often much more challenging than you expect to reduce or stop using any type of substance.

Since it becomes habitual, dependency can develop over time.

Your mind begins to expect certain substances, specifically at certain times of day, with certain people and in certain environments.

For example: You may have a close friend who always smokes weed with you. So when you see him/her – you automatically crave weed.

This is called conditioning. And in this scenario, the meeting with your friend is a trigger.

Being aware of conditioning and triggers is important because you will use this information to your advantage to recover from weed for good.

While outlining your quit plan, you will decide on your approach by considering your conditionings and triggers.

That being said, if you are reading this article, you have likely already attempted to quit smoking weed or at least are preparing yourself to do so. 

Below we have outlined steps you can take into consideration in this process.

Which approach works best for quitting marijuana?

Frankly, there is no best way to give up weed.

An approach that works for someone might not work for you.

Since everyone develops different habitual smoking patterns, considering different methods and maybe a trial and error approach may be beneficial.

In this guide, we will cover quitting cold turkey and quitting gradually in different sections with pros and cons.

Approach 1: Quitting Smoking Weed Gradually (Step by Step)

When you want to quit cannabis with a gradual approach, you should create and stick to a step by step plan.

We have outlined some points you should consider before setting your ultimate quit date.

1) Write Down Your Current Weed Intake

Ask yourself what is your current weed intake? How much are you actually using on an average basis?

For example: If you smoke 1 gram of weed per day and 2 grams on the weekends, write this down.

You will use this information to decide your quit date.

2) How Much Will You Cut Down?

Now that you know how much you smoke, ask yourself what is realistic as a goal for cutting down?

For example: Will you be able to cut down to 0.5 grams of weed a day during the week and 1 gram on the weekends?

Write down the amount you want to cut down gradually. Setting realistic goals is important in this step.

You might be tempted to say you will cut more and end up not doing it.

This negative consequence may harm your confidence in yourself, so it is better to set a realistic goal than to set something impossible.

3) Timeline with A Quit Day

Set out a timeline with a definite quit day.

When you calculate the amount you cut, create a schedule of milestone days.

It is critical that you put your plans to cut back on a specific schedule, otherwise it will be very easy to slip back into using more.

For example: Every 3 days or 5 days, you will decrease the amount you decided from your cannabis consumption.

The day you reduce to zero is the day you choose as your quit day.

Please note that you shouldn’t select your quit day too much farther in the future since you may forget your goal and lose motivation along the way.

When motivation lessens, it will be easy to rationalize with yourself to use more than, for example, the 0.5-gram plan.

Thus, deciding on the intervals between milestone days is crucial.

For the timeline, put the reduction amount on a schedule. For example, the plan in step two will be completed for the next 2 weeks and at that point, you will cut that in half as well.

4) Be Flexible And Patient During Your Schedule

Be flexible and patient with yourself.

For example: If it turns out that cutting 0.5 grams is not realistic, instead of beating yourself up, adjust your goal to cut back to 0.75 grams.

It is okay to go more slowly than you set out.

The hard part is giving yourself the necessary time to adapt to the changes.

5) Coping Skills

Introduce yourself to new ways of regulating your emotions.

You may not realize how much weed may be acting as a coping mechanism until you cut it out.

Look at what are some new ways of coping with feelings of anxiety or depression before reducing use.

Prepare yourself for the reduction by looking into what might work for you. We will elaborate on this more in the following sections.

how to quit smoking weed and marijuana addiction with a gradually step by step plan by trafalgar

A Tool: SMART Action Plan For Quitting Weed Gradually

There are 5 important guidelines for sticking to any goal.

They need to be:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Realistic and
  • Time-specific

When making your action plan for cutting off cannabis gradually, make sure that all of these aspects are considered.

A smart action plan show how to quit weed and marijuana

Here is an example of a plan using the SMART guidelines:

You may fill out your own measures and ideas.

  • Specific: I will stop smoking weed completely in the next 6 months.
  • Measurable: I currently smoke 1 gram every day. My goal is to reduce this to 0.5 grams in the first month, in the second month cut this down to every other day, in month 3 cut this down to 0.25 grams per day, then in month 4 to every other day, in month 4 cut down to 2 days per week and month 5 to 1 day per week.
  • Achievable: I believe it is attainable for me to reduce my weed intake on this gradual plan for the next 6 months. It would be unattainable for me to quit weed cold turkey.
  • Realistic: I realize it will be difficult for me to stick to this plan because all my friends smoke weed around me. I realize I will need to either talk to my friends about not smoking around me for a period of time or I will reduce the amount of time I spend with them.
  • Time-specific: I have set out this schedule and will stick to this plan. I will review it at the end of each month and see if it needs to be adjusted.
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Approach 2: Quitting Weed Cold Turkey

You may not want to quit smoking weed on a gradual basis because:

You may need to quit immediately for many reasons (work, relationships, school, legal issues etc).

You may be the type of person who does things ‘all or nothing’ and it may work best for you to cut it out completely.

In this part of our guide, we will talk about the strategies for quitting cold turkey.

Prepare Yourself

Look at what ‘function’ marijuana currently fills.

Ask yourself what are other ways you could fill that function?

Example #1: If weed helps you fall asleep…

Look into different ways of how you can help yourself sleep.

Instead of smoking pot, you may:

  • eat less before bedtime so the full stomach doesn’t disturb you
  • staying away from the blue light of mobile phones, tablets and TV before bedtime
  • relaxing before going to bed with a warm shower and light stretching
  • listening to soothing music or white noises
  • creating a pitch dark sleep environment with blackout curtains
  • ventilating the room and keeping a temperature between 60-67 °F (16-20 °C)
  • exercise 10-30 minutes (ideally no later than 5pm) every day to improve your sleep quality

You can look up other ‘sleep hygiene’ tactics and start practicing these right away.

Example #2: If weed helps you deal with work stress and anxiety…

Instead of running to your smoking and weed paraphernalia, try to manage your work stress and anxiety with these long-term tactics:

  • Control your breath. Try to breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth.
  • Take regular breaks. Stay away from your computer and take a short walk.
  • Do some stretching in front of the computer to help your body relax.
  • Communicate more with your coworkers. Sometimes socializing and confiding your anxiety in trusted team members may be helpful and make you feel less lonely.
  • Keep work/life balance. Try not to bring work home and spend your leisure time with family, friends and hobbies.

Give some time for these things to become habitual before judging their effectiveness.

Remove The Substance and Get Rid of All The Gear

This suggestion is crucial.

Get rid of all weed and weed paraphernalia you own.

When you have them handy, it is always easy to postpone your goals and get into the vicious circle of “I will do it tomorrow”, a typical procrastination sentence.

Delete your weed dealer’s phone number (and block it if possible).

Change your daily route if there is a cannabis store on your way.

Remove the ‘option’ for yourself as much as possible. 

Let People Know, Make Yourself Accountable

You may want to ‘just stop smoking’ and tell everyone later – but this is often hard.

By telling people, it will keep you accountable.

It will let people know not to offer you a joint or weed and you can get social support with your goal.

If you feel intimidated to tell everyone before you are successful, there is another option.

Find a reliable and trusted accountability buddy. This friend, family member or partner can check in on you and help you stay on track when you seem to be forgetful of your goals.

Distract Yourself

It may help to stay busy, to avoid boredom (major trigger for many people) and to keep yourself from focusing on weed.

The section below works for both quitting cannabis cold turkey or gradually.

Try New Things

Allow yourself to experience new activities that do not centre around smoking marijuana or remind you of it.

Getting off weed might be a good excuse to pick up a new hobby.

Try new physical activities: You may find many exercise videos from yoga to body-weight circuits that do not require much equipment or investment.

Regular exercise also benefits mental health and improves your overall physical and psychological well-being.

It will also decrease the symptoms of anxiety, depression or unhappiness you may experience during cutting back weed.

Try new fun things: From board games to computer games, there are many possibilities out there. You can even turn on the music and learn how to dance some Youtube dancing tutorials.

Learning how to draw is also another option.

Distracting yourself from the desire to smoke will help you stick to your goals.

Use this time to improve yourself positively so it will increase your motivation to quit smoking marijuana.

Change Your Routines

As mentioned earlier, we become conditioned to want substances based on the environment. 

So to continue your progress, change some of your triggering routines.

Example #1: If you normally smoke weed every day with your girlfriend on the balcony at 9 pm…

  • Ask her to watch a movie inside with you at that time or
  • Request her to not smoke in front of you.

Example #2: If you smoke when you see a certain friend…

  • Try to meet with them in places where you cannot smoke or
  • Simply refrain yourself from seeing them for a while.

Don’t Give Up

It is normal to have slip-ups.

If you quit cold turkey and have a slip, do not tell yourself that you are incapable – remind yourself this is difficult and work through how the slip happened.

Remember, your cannabis addiction wasn’t developed in one day.

So you may not develop opposite habits in one day as well. And this is totally acceptable.

Identify what led to the relapse and adjust your skills/goals to make sure it does not reoccur.

Learn From Your Mistakes. Try Again.

Create a set plan for how you will cope with a desire to relapse.

As we mentioned in the previous section, learn from your mistakes and identify what caused you to relapse.

And according to these triggers and conditions, make a safety plan that you can use instead of returning to weed the next time.

Prepare some answers or action plans for specific situations.

For example:

  • Practice some polite refusal sentences in case a marijuana user offers you a joint.
  • If your friends decide to smoke, plan to take a walk and come back after they finish.
  • If you happen to find yourself in a situation that you didn’t think of before, have a supportive friend you can call to help distract you.

Simply engaging a phone call in a social environment would help your mind be absent from the current situation, thus increase your chances not to relapse.

Predetermining different verbal and behavioural responses to different situations strengthen your hand in your recovery journey from marijuana. 

This guide show how to quit smoking weed step by step in Toronto, Ontario

Why Is it Challenging To Quit Smoking Weed?

Quitting smoking weed could be challenging as you might experience cannabis withdrawal effects.

Cannabis Withdrawal Effects

While these psychological and physical symptoms do not usually present a direct danger to your health, they can be severely unpleasant and disruptive.

They may last anywhere from two weeks to several months.

In some cases the psychological symptoms may last much longer. Understanding more about them may ease your mind.

Effect #1: Cravings

Cravings are naturally the most common symptom of marijuana withdrawal.

They may be consistent or come on suddenly. They may also vary in intensity at different times.

This intensity will usually be influenced by the length of the time and the amount you used weed.

Effect #2: Irritability or Anger

During weed withdrawal, you may feel very irritable or angry.

You may experience these feelings consistently or in short bursts. This is totally normal and will ease over time.

Effect #3: Anxiety or Agitation

Feelings of anxiety or agitation are very common symptoms of marijuana withdrawal.

You may struggle to focus, relax, sleep or interact with others as a result of these feelings.

Again, these feelings will usually subside over time as marijuana leaves your system and you adjust to life without it.

Effect #4: Mood Swings, Depression

You may also experience mood swings or depression.

Your body and mind are trying to adjust to life without the mood-enhancing and stabilizing effects of marijuana.

Effect #5: Headaches

Headaches are common symptoms of marijuana withdrawal.

This is a natural effect of ending the use of a substance your body has come to depend upon.

Headaches will usually ease as the withdrawal process continues. However, if they persist beyond a few weeks and at a severe level, you should speak to a doctor.

Effect #6: Focus and Memory Issues (Cognitive Impairment)

Regular, sustained weed use can negatively affect your cognitive function.

This means that you may experience issues with focus and memory.

This is a natural part of the body’s adjustment to no longer using marijuana. As your body adjusts to recovery, your cognitive functions will improve back.

Effect #7: Problems With Sleep

While going through weed withdrawal, you may experience problems with sleep.

Insomnia is a very common symptom of the withdrawal process.

You may previously have relied on the substance to get to sleep or stay asleep. Exercising daily can be helpful for these symptoms.

The agitation and restlessness common in withdrawal may also prevent you from getting adequate sleep.

It is also common to experience vivid, disturbing dreams for weeks or months after ending marijuana use. These symptoms will usually subside over time.

Effect #8: Weight Change or Loss of Appetite

Marijuana withdrawal can change your appetite. This usually lasts two or three weeks at most.

Effect #9: Changes in Sex Drive

You may experience changes in your sex drive, as well. It is usually temporary and will subside as you progress through the withdrawal process.

Effect #10: Flu-like Symptoms

In the early phases of weed withdrawal, you can experience flu-like symptoms as your body adjusts.

These symptoms may include headaches, tremors, aches, excessive sweating, fever and chills.

However, they are relatively rare and will usually only occur in the first week or two.

Getting Help For Withdrawal

During the withdrawal process, you can always ask help to manage these symptoms.

Some of them are related to concurrent diseases which are the reasons for marijuana use in the first place, like addressing your anxiety or depression problems.

Recovery from this addiction will give you the opportunity to address your issues with a therapist in a progressive way, rather than masking them with weed.

It is always important to note that, you may struggle to fulfill your professional and personal responsibilities during the first two weeks of the withdrawal process.

So, it is important to be aware of this when quitting cannabis.

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Other Factors That Make Quitting Difficult

There will be days that are difficult to stick to the outlined plan of weed reduction.

The following would be factors that can contribute to it being more difficult:

Experiencing intense emotions

When you experience extreme happiness, sadness or anger, you are more likely at risk for increasing your weed use. Hence, a higher likelihood of relapsing back to higher substance use.

Interpersonal conflicts

If you have a fight with your girlfriend/boyfriend, you have an issue with a coworker, you are going to be more likely to return to higher substance use. When we have relationship issues, we often turn to substances for self-soothing.

Environmental factors

If you go to a party, see friends who smoke weed, go to your favourite park where you used to smoke – your mind will automatically be triggered to thinking of smoking. You will be ‘cued’ into wanting to use even though you have set out your goals.

Social support

If all of your friends, your partner and family engage in smoking weed, this is going to be very difficult.

If your loved ones are not encouraging you to quit, this will require some workaround communicating about your desire to change and what you need from them.

If your social network is supportive – still explain to them what you may need.

How to Quit Weed (When Nothing Seems to Have Worked)

This is a common question many people are currently asking and realizing to quit smoking weed is a challenging feat.

In the case that you have tried all of the options above and nothing seems to be working, there are a few more options you can try:

  • Speaking to a Professional: A therapist can be very helpful in working through what makes it so challenging for you personally to give up weed. Here you can understand concurrent disorders and addressing them would help you quit your marijuana addiction easily.
  • Virtual (At Home) Treatment Programs: Do you know that you can quit marijuana with virtual outpatient programs in the comfort of your home, at your convenience? You can start your recovery journey easily with a comprehensive and structured online treatment program.
  • Outpatient Addiction Counselling: Some Addiction Centres offer outpatient rehab programs that teach you how to quit using marijuana.
  • Residential Treatment: If you have tried everything and need more help, inpatient rehab treatment is likely the best option.

Conclusion

Many people follow these guidelines to quit their marijuana addiction.

It is easy to say giving up weed “should be simple” but this is not always the case.

Sometimes life gets in the way and you simply cannot stop it.

It doesn’t mean you will have to live with your weed addiction forever.

There is always help and you are not alone.

More and more people are coming into our addiction treatment centres looking for how to quit smoking weed.

Weed can become a very difficult habit to break, and outpatient and residential treatment centres offer individualized programs designed to assist in such a goal.

For many people there needs to be an absolute barrier between themselves and the substance in order to quit, this is where residential care comes into place with inpatient rehab options.

For some others, outpatient addiction counselling or virtual rehab programs may suffice.

If this is the case, we suggest you to do a research about the costs of rehab options with this guide.

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Some Interesting Weed Addiction Statistics

In the addiction field we are noticing more frequently that young adults are struggling more often with the question of how to quit smoking weed than in the past. 

Let’s look at the statistics.

According to the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, weed has been a growing problem for many individuals in Canada. These numbers are likely higher as many may feel uncomfortable giving an honest report on substance use.

2,3 Million People Use Marijuana in Canada.
1/4 Million Number of People Who Use It Daily Are Aged 12 – 17.
Annual Number of Arrests for All Offences Concerning Illegal Drugs: 90,000
how to quit weed infographic

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